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Generic Weekly Hotlap Challenge #117 – A Nose Job

Discussion in 'Console Lounge' started by Totall Wrytoff, Feb 24, 2019.

  1. Totall Wrytoff

    Totall Wrytoff Hardcore Simmer

    Welcome to the thread for the Weekly Hotlap Challenge #117 – A Nose Job, Round Four of the Weekly Hotlap Championship League and Round Four of the mini-series, Formula 1 in February.

    The Challenge:
    Hotlap
    Car: Ferrari SF15-T
    Track: Red Bull Ring GP
    upload_2019-2-24_21-18-40.png
    upload_2019-2-24_21-18-56.png
    Not yet used in WHC, the SF15-T was Ferrari’s 61st Grand Prix car, designed by James Allison and Ferrari’s entry for the 2015 F1 season. It was driven by Sebastian Vettel and Kimi Räikkönen. The car won three of the nineteen races that season and with sixteen podiums in total, the team finished second in the championship.
    It weighs just over 700kg with fluids and is powered by a tiny 1.6litre V6 turbo, but that is supplemented by frighteningly complex Kinetic and Thermal energy recovery systems, as you will discover! These deliver an enormous amount of torque 1148 Nm (847 lb/ft) and according to some, a possible total of 1340bhp. More conservative estimates are approximately 600hp from the 1600cc V6, which is amazing and around 160hp from the regen. AC quotes a total of 840hp.

    However, it won’t be plain sailing. Set-up will be key this week. Managing the SF15-T’s various in car systems is crucial to getting the best performance from the car and a good lap time. You will need to understand and manage the following:
    PU: Power Unit
    SOC: State of Charge
    ICU: Internal Combustion Unit
    ECU: Electronic Control Unit
    ERS: Energy Recovery System
    DRS: Drag Reduction System
    MGU-H: Motor Generator Unit-Heat
    MGU-K: Motor Generator Unit-Kinetic

    “To find the optimum average laptime over a race stint in the Ferrari SF15-T a driver must work to find a balance between MGU-K deployment and regeneration that suits the particular track layout and their driving style, all the while maintaining sufficient ERS battery SOC for when it is needed to overtake. Additionally, depending on the race configuration, a driver must keep fuel consumption under control, hit the DRS button in the right places, manage brake bias and engine braking settings as fuel load changes, and use the conventional steering wheel and pedals to keep the car on the road.”

    To demystify the set-up options and hopefully save some hours of testing, I will publish a very excellent document below this post. Huge thanks to the authors Jon Denton and Luis Branco (http://ptsims.net/forum/index.php?topic=13336.0). I don’t know who they are but I like them enormously.

    If you don’t have a degree in Physics and Engineering, the Hotlap tip is this:
    “It would be assumed that over a qualifying lap, the driver would configure the MGU-H to MOTOR mode (in this mode the MGU-H will recover energy from exhaust gases and direct this power directly into the MGU-K, thus supplementing overall power output) to supplement the MGU-K power and provide the maximum manageable power output over one lap.)”
    upload_2019-2-24_21-20-42.png
    Nose job? 2014 car on the left, 2015 car on the right.

    We haven’t used the Red Bull Ring in a while and I thought a simpler track would suit this complex car. This combi also features in the Assetto Corsa Special Event Race, Beat the Champions. So if you haven’t beaten Seb and Kimi at Alien level, hopefully this should provide the practise for you to get the Gold. The Red Bull Ring is a Herman Tilke design and owned by Dietrich Mateschitz. The lap record is 1:06.957 set by Kimi Räikkönen last year in the Ferrari SF71H.

    In 2015 Seb did a 1:08.810 in Q3, which put him third on the grid and about 4/10ths behind Lewis on pole. His fastest lap in the race was a 1:11.499 on lap 44. Kimi Raikkonen crashed out on lap one, spectacularly taking Alonso with him and starting the debate around Halo.

    Here are the recommended tyre pressures:
    Slick supersoft = 19psi minTF = 90 maxTF = 115
    Slick soft = 20psi minTR = 90 maxTR = 115
    Slick medium = 21psi minTF = 105 maxTF = 125
    Slick hard = 22 minTF = 110 maxTF = 135

    How to take part - Hot lap:
    To enter, select Drive > Hotlap, choose the Ferrari SF15-T and the Red Bull Ring GP circuit. Please setup the session using the settings below:

    Mode: Hotlap
    Time of day: Free
    Ambient Temp: 26 Degrees
    Setup: Free
    Controller: Free
    Assists: Factory
    Stability: Free

    To qualify for WHC you must have the ambient temp set to 26 DegC.

    Deadline: Sunday 3rd March 2019 - 21:00 GMT.

    You can run as many laps as you like and update your times as often as you like. It is all about taking part, testing yourself and enjoying Assetto Corsa. All Platforms are welcome.
    To submit a time, pause the game and select 'session' from the menu and screenshot this page or take a photo of your screen and post it in this thread - Note all the information from the screen is required including temperature, mode heading and of course the car being used!
    Please post video clips and share information in here as well, but without the session screen your time will not be included (placing the session screen in a video clip is acceptable).

    Please use the following format to post your times:
    Your time, to be shown as x.xx.xxx.
    Your platform (PC Xb1 PS4)
    The image or screen shot showing your time.
    Your thoughts and comment

    Please mark updated times with Improvement.

    A leader board is collated regularly. Unfortunately editing of posts gets locked on this forum so this post cannot be updated.

    From now on: Weekly Hotlap Challenge Championship League
    How it works:

    1. Enter the Weekly Hotlap Challenge as posted every Sunday evening and you will be automatically entered into the league table.
    2. Your ranking in the final standings, posted on Sunday evening, will earn you points, as follows:
    Place Points: 1st 14 2nd 13 3rd 12 4th 11 5th 10 6th 9 7th 8 8th 7 9th 6 10th 5
    3. Every player taking part in a WHC, but finishing outside the top 10 will get 4 points.
    4. Every player who is in the table, (ie has entered a previous WHC) but does not play that week will get three points each week.
    5. Players that join WHC after next week's WHC#114 will be awarded 3 points retrospectively for every WHC missed. For example, if you enter WHC for the first time at WHC#124, your name will be added to the table, with 27 points, plus whatever you score in WHC#124.
    6. Each week 3 bonus points may be awarded at "the judges' discretion". Criteria for earning the Bonus Points are not fixed but will include:
    *An amusing pic or amusing post
    * Any "very excellent" contribution to the forum/ group
    *Significant effort and improvement (so either lots of times submitted, or a big improvement between the first time submitted and final time)
    *Posting a brilliant set-up
    *Continuous participation - loyalty to WHC
    * Correcting mistakes by the administrator
    * Having a disastrous Valentines
    OR anything else the judges decide worthy.

    The updated Championship league table will be displayed in a new post in the Console Lounge each week.

    7. Specialist Challenges will also feature throughout the season. These will be as monthly mini-series, for example Formula 1 February or Muscle Car Month, or nominated car types, for example the best driver in road cars. These events will be announced in the WHC Thread. The winner of each Specialist Challenge will receive 5 bonus points.

    At the end of the year, the WHC before Xmas week, the winners will be declared -
    * Championship podium
    * Specialist Challenge Winners
    * 1st place Contributor (the most Bonus points)
    * 1st place Loyal Lapper (who has entered most regularly, most often, if there is a draw, Bonus points count, then Champ points)

    Weekly Hotlap Challenge History

    1. Mugello - Praga R1 Posted by John Gordon 3rd Oct, 2016 (Console Lounge P55)
    2. Imola - Mercedes SLS GT3
    3. Brands Hatch GP - RUF RT12 Posted by GravelTrap 19th Oct 2016 (Console Lounge P54)
    4. Magione - Lotus 2 Eleven
    5. Silverstone International - Abarth 500 Assetto Corse
    6. Zandvoort - Pagani Huayra
    7. Nurburgring GP (GT) - Alfa Romeo 155 V6 TI
    8. Spa - BMW M3 GT2
    9. Vallelunga Club - KTM X-Bow R
    10. Barcelona - Moto - Shelby Cobra 427 S/C
    11. Silverstone 1967 - Lotus 72D
    12. Nordschleife - Porsche 911 Carrera S
    13. Black Cat County - Ferrari LaFerrari
    14. Monza Junior 1966 - Alfa Romeo GTA
    15. Redbull Ring GP - Lamborghini Gallardo Sl
    16. Zandvoort - Ford Escort RS1600
    17. Imola - Mazda Rx-7 Spirit R
    18. Brands Hatch GP - Lotus Exige V6 Cup
    19. Monza - Ferrari FXX K
    20. Barcelona - Moto - Ferrari 488 GT3
    21. Mugello - Alfa Romeo Giulietta QV
    22. Silverstone GP - Porsche 911 GT3 Cup 2017
    23. Nurburgring Sprint GT - Toyota AE86 Tuned
    24. Magione - Maserati Levante S
    25. Spa - Lotus 98T
    26. Vallelunga - Classic - Porsche 935/78 "Moby Dick"
    27. Nordschleife Endurance Cup - M235i Racing
    28. Silverstone 1967 - Maserati 250F T2 12C
    29. Red Bull Ring National - BMW 1M Posted by HavanaB0B, 1st May 2017 (Console Lounge p28)
    30. Zandvoort - Lotus Evora GX
    31. Barcelona GP - Lotus Exos 125 Stage 1
    32. Brands Hatch Indy - Toyota Supra MKIV Time Attack Posted by by Graveltrap 21st May 2017 (Console Lounge p25)
    33. Black Cat County Long - Lamborghini Countach
    34. Imola - Mercedes Benz 190E Evo II
    35. Monza - Chevrolet Corvette C7R
    36. Nurburgring Sprint GT - BMW M3 E30
    37. Magione - Mercedes SLS AMG
    38. Spa - Porsche 917/30 Spyder
    39. Silverstone GP - Nissan GT-R Nismo Posted by Hugo Catarino,9th July 2017 (Console Lounge p21)
    40. RedBull Ring GP - Alfa Romeo 4c
    41. Brands Hatch GP - Audi R8 LMS Ultra
    42. Highlands Long - Ford GT40
    43. Vallelunga - Lotus GTE Carbon
    44. Zandvoort - Porsche 911 Turbo S Posted by Graveltrap 13th Aug 2017 (Console Lounge p19)
    45. Nordschleife - Ferrari 312T
    46. Mugello - BMW M3 E92
    47. Black Cat County - Short - Ford Mustang 2015
    48. Imola - Maserati MC12 GT1
    49. Silverstone 1967 - Porsche 911 Carrera RSR 3.0
    50. Barcelona Moto - McLaren 570S
    51. Magione - Mazda Miata NA
    52. Spa - Ferrari F40
    53. Vallelunga - Corvette C7 Stingray Posted by Moodyryder 23rd Oct 2017 (Console Lounge p14)
    54. Brands Hatch GP - Tatuus FA01
    55. Highlands - Lotus 3 eleven
    56. Nurburgring GP (GT) - Toyota Celica ST185 4WD Turbo
    57. Monza 1966 Full Course - Ferrari 312/67
    58. Nordschleife - Porsche 962 C Short Tail
    59. Zandvoort- Nissan 370Z Nismo
    60. Silverstone GP - McLaren F1
    61. Vallelunga Classic - Ferrari 250GTO
    62. Imola - Lotus 98T
    63. Highlands Drift - P4/5 Competizione
    64. Mugello - Lamborghini Aventador SV
    65. Spa - Porsche 911R
    66. Black Cat County - Lotus 2-Eleven GT4
    67. Barcelona GP - Ferrari SF70H
    68. Nordschleife Endurance & Highlands - Porsche 917k
    69. Zandvoort - Lotus Exige Scura Posted by Hugo Catarino 25th Feb 25 (Console Lounge p7)
    70. RedBull Ring National - Maserati Alfieri
    71. Laguna Seca - Audi Sport quattro S1 E2
    72. Brands Hatch - Mclaren P1
    73. Imola - Porsche 911 RSR
    74. Nurburgring GP - Ferrari F2004
    75. Barcelona Moto - Lamborghini Huracan Performante
    76. Silverstone 1967 - Alfa Romeo 33 Stradale
    77. Magione - BMW 1M Stage 3
    78. Highlands Long - Mazda 787b
    79. Black Cat County - Toyota GT86
    80. Spa - Toyota TS040 Hybrid
    81. Vallelunga Classic - Nissan Skyline R34 V-Spec
    82. Mugello - Ferrari 458 GT2
    83. Silverstone International - RUF R12 R AWD
    84. Highlands Long - Audi R18 e-tron quattro 2014
    85. Monza - Pagani Zonda R
    86. Nordschleife - Lotus 3-eleven
    87. Zandvoort - Maserati GranTurismo MC GT4
    88. Redbull Ring GP - Mercedes Sauber C9
    89. Brands Hatch - Lotus 25
    90. Highlands Short - Abarth 595 SS
    91. Nurburgring GP (GT) - Audi TT Cup
    92. Monza 1966 - Road Course - Porsche 908 LH
    93. Vallelunga - BMW M3 E30 Gr.A 92
    94. Laguna Seca - Alfa Romeo Mito QV
    95. Nordschleife - RUF Yellowbird & Ferrari F40
    96. Barcelona GP - BMW Z4 GT3
    97. Highlands Drift - Ferrari 458 Italia
    98. Spa - Lotus Type 49
    99. Zandvoort - Porsche 911 GT1-98
    100. Silverstone - Nissan GT-R GT3; Brands Hatch - Lotus Exige V6; Vallelunga - free car
    101. Mugello - Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio
    102. Silverstone National - Mazda MX5 Cup or Abarth 500 Assetto Corse
    103. Highlands Short – Ford Escort RS1600 Posted by Totall Wrytoff 11th Nov 2018 (Console Lounge p2)
    104. Black Cat Short – Porsche 917/30
    105. Monza 66 Junior Course – Ferrari F40 S3
    106. Magione – Toyota Supra MkIV
    107. Brands Hatch Indy 5 lap - Porsche 911 GT3 RS
    107. Nurburgring Sprint - Porsche 911 GT3 RS
    108. Nordschleife - Abarth 595SS
    108 Laguna Seca 5 lap - McLaren F1 GTR
    109. Brands Hatch - Ferrari FXX K
    110. Highlands – Lamborghini Muira P400 SV
    111. Imola - Scuderia Glickenhaus SCG 003C
    112. Vallelunga Club – Lotus Exos T125
    113. Highlands Drift - Porsche Cayman GT4 Clubsport
    114. Barcelona Moto - Maserati 250F 6 cylinder
    115. Silverstone GP – Ferrari F138
    116. Laguna Seca – Lotus 72D
    117. Red Bull Ring GP - Ferrari SF15-T
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2019


  2. mike reynolds

    mike reynolds Hardcore Simmer

    Finally, a reason to use the MGU recovery and delivery rotary knobs on my button box!
     
  3. Totall Wrytoff

    Totall Wrytoff Hardcore Simmer

    Ferrari SF15-T set-up guide

    The Ferrari SF15-T car is fitted with Ferrari’s Tipo 059/4 Power Unit, this is a hybrid system that involves multiple components. This post will explain those components and their functions, as well as providing the information required for drivers to be able to optimise the use of the power unit via in car controls whilst on track.

    The following abbreviations will be used:

    PU: Power Unit
    SOC: State of Charge
    ICU: Internal Combustion Unit
    ECU: Electronic Control Unit
    ERS: EnergyRecovery System
    DRS: Drag Reduction System
    MGU-H: Motor Generator Unit-Heat
    MGU-K: Motor Generator Unit-Kinetic

    ICU: This is a relatively standard V6 internal combustion engine, which on its own is not abnormal, though as with all things in the world’s premier racing series, the unit’s internal technology is intricate and fascinating. In this case the Ferrari Tipo 059/4 is a 1.6 litre V6 unit with the V set at 90 degrees, as dictated in the ruleset defined by the series in 2014. The ICU is connected to a turbocharger allowing the engine to be more compact but produce similar power to the 2.4 litre V8 engines used prior to 2014. The turbocharger is a device used to efficiently utilise the energy stored within the engine’s exhaust gases, comprising of a turbine and compressor supported by bearings on the same axis.
    Exhaust gas energy rotates the turbine powering the compressor, which in turn compresses and increases air fed into the engine’s combustion chamber, thus allowing for more fuel combustion and a higher power output. The ICU output is approximately 600 horsepower (hp).

    Due to regulations introduced from 2014 onwards, the rev limit of ICUs was reduced to 15,000 rpm, along with a maximum regulated fuel flow of 100Kg/hour capped at 10,500 rpm. Thus, as power output increases proportionately with the amount of fuel burned, higher revs burn more fuel, and increase output, in a shorter time. By capping the maximum fuel flow at 10,500 rpm, the same amount of fuel flow is available with revs above this point, increasing mechanical resistance, and decreasing the merits of revving higher than 10,500 rpm. In this series the engines of the past were designed to maintain higher revs to create higher output, but the new hybrid rules shift the focus to designing engines that use energy more efficiently. This efficiency drive is focussed by the series regulations stating that vehicles may only use 100Kg of fuel during a Grand Prix.

    MGU-K: The MGU-K is an electrical component, not dissimilar to the KERS systems that the series has used since 2009. The MGU-K takes electrical energy harvested from the rear axle under braking, stores it in the ERS battery, and deploys it to the rear wheels when under power. When powering the car using electrical energy stored in the battery, the MGU-K adds 160hp (at maximum deployment) to the ICU’s 600hp.

    This is not unlike the systems used in some modern road cars. Within the series rulebook, however, the electrical energy charging the battery from the MGU-K is limited to 2 MegaJoules (MJ) per lap, and the maximum energy allowed from the battery to power the MGU-K is limited to 4 MJ per lap, presenting a compromise in management of this energy over a lap. These design restrictions ensure that energy is harvested at a lower rate than it can be deployed, thus compromise is essentially built in to the performance equation.

    MGU-H: The MGU-H is another electrical component within the PU, which adds to the overall efficiency of the unit. The MGU-H converts heat energy from exhaust gases expelled by the ICU into electrical energy to recharge the ERS battery. ERS-H is yet to be used in road going hybrid cars and consequently is a major area of research that may eventually benefit the greater motoring world.
    Unlike the MGU-K, the series rulebook does not place any energy usage restrictions on the MGU-H. Electrical power generated by the MGU-H may be fed directly into the MGU-K, effectively bypassing the MGU-K regeneration restrictions and tapping the full 160hp. This highlights the importance of developing a system to fully utilize the MGU-H, and any new power unit heavily depends on how effectively the MGU-H performs. The overall level of charge harvested from the MGU-H is usually negligible when balanced against the overall output of the PU, this remains a major area of research in power unit development.

    In-car controls
    Assetto Corsa’s detailed model of the Ferrari SF15-T allows the virtual driver to manipulate the various configuration settings of the 059/4 PU in much the same way Ferrari’s race drivers do in real life. The default control assignments, and their functions are noted below:


    MGU-K Regen rate.
    This is covered by 10 settings (0%-100%). This manages how aggressively the MGU-K harvests energy from braking events on the rear axle. With 100% being the most aggressive setting and thus harvesting the most energy into the battery at a given time. Thus, management of this setting can affect the handling of the car in a number of ways:
    A higher percentage of energy regeneration in the MGU-K will mean for a greater level of retardation upon the rear axle when off throttle (coast) and braking, possibly resulting in entry oversteer. Higher regen will also result in longer braking distances. With the offset being that the internal ERS battery SOC will increase faster based on the higher percentage.
    A lower percentage of energy regeneration will mean less energy is being charged into the ERS battery for deployment on power. The offset to this is a more precise level of braking control via normal brake balance, and shorter braking distances.


    MGU-K Deployment profiles:
    These are named profiles that define variable rates of MGU-K power output to the rear wheels under power.
    When adjusting MGU-K deployment settings it is key to recognise that the benefits of adding MGU-K power output to the ICU’s power output are most applicable under mid-range acceleration; which in a car of this performance level covers the area from 140-280kmh. Provided there is sufficient traction available to the tyres, this is where the most gains will be seen by utilising the hybrid powertrain. The Ferrari SF15-T utilises “profiles” for deployment of MGU-K energy, these profiles try to optimise MGU-K power output during these acceleration phases of a lap, sometimes sacrificing top speed in the process. Some profiles also reduce MGU-K output at very low speeds where there may not be enough traction available to the rear wheels to manage the available torque. We will go through the six available profiles below:

    Charging (0):
    The lowest deployment setting. It deploys no ERS battery power and leaves the ICU to do all the work. This allows the fastest battery re-charge rate in conjunction with MGU-K regen rate settings.
    Balanced Low (1): This profile commences MGU-K power delivery at 120kmh at a rate of 10% total MGU-K deployment, on an increasing scale based upon speed, throttle opening, and gear selection, peaking at 80% of total MGU-K power between 170-250kmh. Then, from 250-300kmh total output reduces to 40% of total MGU-K power, reducing still to 0% above 300kmh.
    When on the throttle in this profile, the driver will receive MGU-K power only when the pedal is above 50% deflection. Below 50% throttle there will be no MGU-K power supplementing the ICU.
    These areas (Road speed, throttle deflection) are multiplied together and then multiplied once again with gear selection according to the below chart:
    1st: 0%
    2nd: 0%
    3rd: 20%
    4th: 50%
    5th: 100%
    6th: 100%
    7th: 100%
    8th: 0%

    Examples:
    1.) In the balanced low profile the driver is proceeding at 220kmh (80% or 0.8), on full throttle (1.0), in third gear (20% or 0.2), giving a multiplied MGU-K output of: 1.0 x 0.8 x 0.2 = 0.16 or 16% total MGU-K deployment.
    2.) In the balanced low profile the driver is proceeding at 255kmh (40% or 0.4), on full throttle (1.0), in fifth gear (100% or 1.0), giving a multiplied MGU-K output of: 1.0 x 1.0 x 0.4 = 40% total MGU-K deployment.

    Balanced High (2):
    This profile is a more aggressive form of the previous profile, using a similar multiplier. MGU-K power delivery commences at 120kmh at 70% total MGU-K deployment, on an increasing scale based upon speed, throttle opening, and gear selection, peaking at 100% of total MGU-K power between 160-260kmh. Then, from 260kmh MGU-K power delivery ramps downwards, with 270kmh giving 70% power, 280kmh giving 40%, scaling gradually to reduce to 0% deployment at 300kmh or above.
    When on the throttle in this profile, the driver will receive MGU-K power only when the pedal is above 50% deflection. Below 50% throttle there will be no MGU-K power supplementing the ICU.
    These areas (Road speed, throttle deflection) are multiplied together and then multiplied once again with gear selection according to the below chart:
    1st: 0%
    2nd: 50%
    3rd: 70%
    4th: 100%
    5th: 100%
    6th: 100%
    7th: 70%
    8th: 0%

    Examples:
    1.) In the balanced high profile the driver is proceeding at 220kmh (100% or 1.0), on full throttle (1.0), in third gear (70% or 0.7), giving a multiplied MGU-K output of: 1.0 x 1.0 x 0.7 = 0.70 or 70% total MGU-K deployment.
    2.) In the balanced high profile the driver is proceeding at 255kmh (100% or 1.0), on full throttle (1.0), in fifth gear (100% or 1.0), giving a multiplied MGU-K output of: 1.0 x 1.0 x 1.0 = 100% total MGU-K deployment.

    Overtake (3):
    Probably the highest MGU-K deployment rate generally used in races, this setting provides good power output at higher speeds for a situation whereby the driver is in a battle with another car and needs as much power as they can get for short bursts. Naturally the battery SOC will deplete faster on this setting so it cannot be used for extended periods.
    MGU-K power delivery commences on the overtake profile at 160kmh with 50% total MGU-K deployment, this then adopts an increasing scale of MGU-K deployment based on road speed peaking at 100% deployment at 260kmh. Then, from 260kmh MGU-K power delivery ramps downwards somewhat, with 270kmh giving 70% power, but unlike previous profiles the deployment rate stays at 70% from 270kmh to maximum speed.
    When on the throttle in this profile, the driver will receive MGU-K power only when the pedal is above 80% deflection. Below 80% throttle there will be no MGU-K power supplementing the ICU, suggesting that this profile is primarily used for situations when the driver is really pushing. At 80% deflection the driver will receive 40% deployment, at 90% deflection 80%, and 100% deployment at 100% throttle opening.
    These areas (Road speed, throttle deflection) are multiplied together and then multiplied once again with gear selection according to the below chart:
    1st: 0%
    2nd: 0%
    3rd: 50%
    4th: 100%
    5th: 100%
    6th: 100%
    7th: 100%
    8th: 100%

    Examples:
    1.) In the overtake profile the driver is proceeding at 220kmh (82.5% or 0.825), on full throttle (1.0), in third gear (50% or 0.5), giving a multiplied MGU-K output of: 1.0 x 0.825 x 0.5 = 0.4125 or 41.3% total MGU-K deployment.
    2.) In the overtake profile the driver is proceeding at 255kmh (97.5% or 0.975), on full throttle (1.0), in fifth gear (100% or 1.0), giving a multiplied MGU-K output of: 1.0 x 1.0 x 0.975 = 97.5% total MGU-K deployment.

    Top Speed (4):
    As the name suggests, the Top Speed profile is setup to deliver the highest performance at higher speeds and gears. This profile is mostly specific to circuits such as Monza, as it works to save as much ERS battery power as possible at lower speeds to be able to deploy more MGU-K power at higher speeds.
    MGU-K power delivery commences in the top speed profile at 120kmh scaling from 0% to 60% MGU-K deployment at 200kmh. Then through 200-250kmh deployment is fixed at 60%, with a gradual decrease in deployment to 50% from 250-330kmh where it stays at 50% to maximum speed.
    When on the throttle in this profile, the driver will receive MGU-K power only when the pedal is above 80% deflection. Below 80% throttle there will be no MGU-K power supplementing the ICU. At 80% deflection the driver will receive 40% deployment, at 90% deflection 80%, and 100% deployment at 100% throttle opening. This is the same throttle map as the overtake profile.
    These areas (Road speed, throttle deflection) are multiplied together and then multiplied once again with gear selection according to the below chart:
    1st: 0%
    2nd: 0%
    3rd: 0%
    4th: 100%
    5th: 100%
    6th: 100%
    7th: 100%
    8th: 100%

    Examples:
    1.) In the top speed profile the driver is proceeding at 220kmh (60% or 0.6), on full throttle (1.0), in third gear (0%), giving a multiplied MGU-K output of: 1.0 x 0.6 x 0 = 0 or 0% total MGU-K deployment.
    2.) In the top speed profile the driver is proceeding at 255kmh (59.38% or 0.5938), on full throttle (1.0), in fifth gear (100% or 1.0), giving a multiplied MGU-K output of: 1.0 x 1.0 x 0.5938 = 0.5938 or 59.4% total MGU-K deployment.

    Hotlap (5):
    This profile is the highest setting for MGU-K deployment but it is not a simple matter of 100% deployment throughout all areas, as deployment must still be balanced to provide a drivable car and enough energy deployment to cover a single lap.
    This setting is usually used in qualifying in conjunction with minimal regen rates to deliver maximum performance from the PU. At this setting, on most circuits, the battery SOC will be depleted to zero in one or two laps.
    MGU-K power delivery commences in the hotlap profile at 100kmh scaling from 0% to 20% MGU-K deployment at 120kmh. Then through 120-160kmh deployment scales up from 20% to 100% where it stays until maximum speed.
    When on the throttle in the hotlap profile, the driver will receive MGU-K power when the pedal hits 10% deflection at a rate of 10% MGU-K deployment. With a linear scale moving up to 100% MGU-K deployment on 100% throttle. Providing a linear throttle response to MGU-K power delivery in this profile is designed to allow the driver to extract the maximum possible performance from the car over a single lap.
    These areas (Road speed, throttle deflection) are multiplied together and then multiplied once again with gear selection according to the below chart:
    1st: 20%
    2nd: 70%
    3rd: 70%
    4th: 70%
    5th: 70%
    6th: 70%
    7th: 70%
    8th: 70%

    Examples:
    1.) In the hotlap profile the driver is proceeding at 220kmh (100% or 1.0), on full throttle (1.0), in third gear (70% or 0.7), giving a multiplied MGU-K output of: 1.0 x 1.0 x 0.7 = 0.7 or 70% total MGU-K deployment.
    2.) In the hotlap profile the driver is proceeding at 255kmh (100% or 1.0), on full throttle (1.0), in fifth gear (70% or 0.7), giving a multiplied MGU-K output of: 1.0 x 1.0 x 0.7 = 0.7 or 70% total MGU-K deployment.

    It may seem surprising that the hotlap profile balances MGU-K deployment to 70% in gears above 2nd and does not scale to 100%. This is to preserve enough SOC to complete the lap. It would be assumed that over a qualifying lap, the driver would configure the MGU-H to MOTOR mode (See section below) to supplement the MGU-K power and provide the maximum manageable power output over one lap.

    MGU-H Mode:
    This setting controls how the MGU-H operates in conjunction with other PU components:

    Motor:
    In this mode the MGU-H will recover energy from exhaust gases and direct this power directly into the MGU-K, thus supplementing overall power output.

    Battery:
    In this mode the MGU-H recovers exhaust gases and diverts this energy into the ERS battery to increase the SOC.


    Engine Brake (Range 1-13):
    This setting sets the ECU within the ICU to retain a small percentage of fuel flow to blow onto the diffuser, reducing engine braking from the ICU on coast. This offsets the high level of coast locking on the rear axle that is generated with higher MGU-K regen settings (CTRL+1).
    Lower settings reduce the level of engine braking and thus reduces retardation from the drivetrain onto the rear axle under coast. This provides easier management of rear axle locking with MGU-K regen and brake balance. Due to the increase in diffuser exhaust flow, a lower setting will also provide additional rear downforce and stability. However, a lower engine brake settings will consume more fuel and thus affect fuel consumption over a stint.
    Higher settings allow a more conventional drivetrain linkage and thus more retardation to the rear axle from the ICU, this needs to be balanced against MGU-K regen settings to provide a comfortable balance for the driver along with suitable fuel consumption numbers.

    KERS:
    As with other cars in Assetto Corsa, the KERS button can be mapped in the SF15-T. This provides an instant “max power” button for use in battles with other cars. Applying the KERS button essentially reflects the following ERS settings:
    MGU-K regen to 0%
    MGU-K deploy profile to Hotlap
    MGU-H mode to Motor
    This persists while the KERS button is held down, and thus must be used carefully as it will dramatically reduce battery SOC.

    DRS:
    DRS opens a slot gap in the rear wing on certain denoted parts of the circuit that significantly reduces drag and increases top speed. This is freely usable in practice and qualifying sessions, but restricted in the race to being used only when within one second of the car in front. Upon entering the DRS zone the white LED light on the top far-left of the steering wheel will illuminate, and upon pressing the DRS button the second light in will also illuminate to indicate that the DRS is open. Opening of the DRS has to be engaged by the driver when the car enters the DRS zone. In the DRS zone the driver should press the DRS button as soon as possible to maximise performance through the zone the DRS will close when the driver applies the brakes at the end of the zone. Opening the DRS in the rear wing has a knock-on effect of reducing rear downforce and thus upsetting the front to rear downforce balance. This is something the driver must be aware of when the DRS is open.

    Managing the SF15-T on track.
    At all times that the Ferrari SF15-T is on track, as long as the driver sets the above switches accordingly, energy is either being harvested into the ERS battery, or is being deployed from the ERS battery in different ways depending on what the car is doing.
    Under braking the MGU-K generates electricity from part of the kinetic energy lost when the car is braking, and stores that electricity in the ERS battery. As the MGU-K’s maximum output is 160hp (or 120 kiloWatts) and the amount of energy allowed to be stored in the battery is 2MJ per lap, the SF15-T needs to brake for around 16.7 seconds per lap to reach this maximum charge.
    Upon acceleration out of corners the car can accelerate faster by adding the power output of the MGU-K to the ICU’s power output, in the process depleting the SOC of the ERS battery. However, concurrently the MGU-H can be utilising the exhaust gases to recharge the ERS battery (when in BATTERY mode), while the ICU’s turbocharger uses its compressor to send compressed air into the engine. Under full-acceleration, the exhaust energy fed to the turbine can increase to a point where it exceeds the amount of air the compressor can handle to feed into the engine, in this situation the MGU-H converts this excess exhaust energy into electricity, which it can then send directly to the MGU-K for deployment to the rear wheels, or used to increase the battery SOC.
    There are no rules for how much electricity the MGU-H is allowed to generate, so the MGU-K’s output can be added to the ICU’s output without worrying about the rules on the amount of electricity that the battery can charge or discharge. Thus, unused exhaust energy can be efficiently used to accelerate faster.
    The MGU-H also solves the problem of turbo “lag” on power application by using an electrical motor to power the turbo’s compressor, saving the turbine from having to wait for the exhaust gas to do so.

    At different stages of a race two cars can have very different braking performance due to MGU-K harvesting (regen), and thus a driver must be mindful of their competitor’s actions on track with regard to their regen rate. This is visible to a following driver by the red rain light flashing under braking or coast conditions.

    Managing the SF15-T’s various in car systems is crucial for a driver to achieve the best performance from the car and thus potential success. Each circuit will present different car configurations as battery recharge is dependent on braking events and total deployment will vary based on the amount of time spent on throttle over a lap. The key to this configuration is to find an optimum balance between deploy and regen on the MGU-K that you can work within to maintain a reasonable SOC, whilst using the push-to-pass button to increase power at required intervals. A driver must constantly be aware of, and manage the battery SOC.

    Ideally, a driver will want to maximise performance with the highest possible MGU-K deployment setting over a stint. If you perform a lap with a deploy profile of “Hotlap”, and a regen rate of zero then you may find on some circuits that the ERS battery is flat within one lap, with the maximum deployment of 2MJ completed well before the end of the lap. Thus you will need to start to dialing in some regen. The assumption would be that maximum regen would be desirable, to always recover as much battery in braking events, but the compromise here comes in braking performance. As the MGU-K works to harvest energy from the rear axle, there is a an additional diff locking effect that not only increases braking zones, but also introduces handling instability into the corner entry phase. Depending on the steering angle in the car this can be understeer or oversteer. Understeer can be seen when the MGU-K regen is taken into account by the dynamic brake balance system that attempts to re-balance braking performance by reducing rear brake pressure, to prevent rear wheel locking; this gives the feeling that brake bias is moved forward (though it should be understood that no additional brake pressure is moved forward, there is only a reduction in rear brake pressure). Oversteer can potentially be seen on the entry phase of a corner as the driver turns in and releases the brake, at this point the MGU-K regen setting will retain a braking effect upon the rear axle that can initiate oversteer as the steering angle increases.

    This behavior, and potentially variable braking performance is to be expected with higher MGU-K regen rates.
    It is the case that with the lowest possible regen settings on the MGU-K, the shortest braking distances can be achieved, and thus faster laptimes. As well as that, the feeling of the car on entry is “cleaner”, whereby the driver feels more in control of the car’s balance upon entry to the corner via their own foot pedals and relative brake balance setting. As the driver adjusts the MGU-K regen and deploy settings the balance of the car on entry and exit can change notably, meaning a driver has to become adaptable to these changes as they drive. A qualifying run with heavily aggressive MGU settings will suit for one lap, but when given the balancing act that may be required to maintain efficiency over a full race it is not unlikely to see a very large laptime difference between the two sessions.

    To find the optimum average laptime over a race stint in the Ferrari SF15-T a driver must work to find a balance between MGU-K deployment and regeneration that suits the particular track layout and their driving style, all the while maintaining sufficient ERS battery SOC for when it is needed to overtake. Additionally, depending on the race configuration, a driver must keep fuel consumption under control, hit the DRS button in the right places, manage brake bias and engine braking settings as fuel load changes, and use the conventional steering wheel and pedals to keep the car on the road.

    Got all of that?:D

    Huge thanks again to the authors Jon Denton and Luis Branco (http://ptsims.net/forum/index.php?topic=13336.0).
     
  4. mike reynolds

    mike reynolds Hardcore Simmer

    pre season test!

    1:13:906 PC

    PS it is a Ferrari really!

    SF15-T RBR.PNG
     
  5. moodyryder

    moodyryder Hardcore Simmer

    The '72 at Laguna Seca was fantastic. Possibly my favourite WHL ever.

    Hybrid on the Herman Munster Ring.

    Ah well. The Lord giveth, and the Lord taketh away.

    :)
     
  6. dancamma

    dancamma Racer

    Seems a very tough one this week! Just tried a couple of laps and the car seems very difficult to drive!
     
  7. sissydriver

    sissydriver Alien

    My hope was to avoid a second modern f1car but now it is here. The choice is meh... For me.
    The work you invested
    @Totall Wrytoff - outstanding. Take my hat off. :)
     
  8. sissydriver

    sissydriver Alien

    1.13.982 pc

    1 13 982 117.jpg

    brake late.
    no.
    brake later.
    later....o_O
    crazy car....:cool:
     
  9. dancamma

    dancamma Racer

    I've found this tutorial very useful

     
  10. sissydriver

    sissydriver Alien

    1.12.913 improvement

    1 12 913 117.jpg

    mistakes mistakes....:confused:

    WHC117_2.jpg

    drifting:cool:

    WHC117_1.jpg

    this car needs brain :oops:
     
  11. Sturunen

    Sturunen Gamer

  12. Lewisxbone

    Lewisxbone Alien

    1.10.596 - X1X

    [​IMG]

    First few laps and a lot of work to do but it’s very nice....I like!!!
    Clueless about the MGZHU-KZkESR ZXICU- stuff though so no button pressing going on yet.
     
  13. sissydriver

    sissydriver Alien

    1.12.094 improvement

    1 12 094 117.jpg
     
  14. Lewisxbone

    Lewisxbone Alien

    Improvement

    1.10.092 - X1X

    [​IMG]
     
  15. sissydriver

    sissydriver Alien

    1.11.904 improvement

    1 11 904 117.jpg

    something is fundamentally wrong. think i overdrive it now. enough for today.
    @Sturunen - what a time! :)
     
  16. Lewisxbone

    Lewisxbone Alien

    Improvement

    1.09.826 - X1X

    [​IMG]
     
  17. mike reynolds

    mike reynolds Hardcore Simmer

    1:09:864

    Played with the set up a little, going lower and stiffer to start, twitchy as.... so wouldn't like to try a race with it like this!

    SF15-T RBR.PNG

     
  18. Lewisxbone

    Lewisxbone Alien

    Improvement

    1.09.499 - X1X

    [​IMG]
     
  19. 365gt

    365gt Hardcore Simmer

    That's a great mod,nice one ;)
     
  20. mike reynolds

    mike reynolds Hardcore Simmer

    Might need the Mercedes skin to go faster!
     
    Lewisxbone likes this.

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